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Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice.

Category archives for “laws and regulations governing alcoholic beverages”

Supplier-Funded Instant Rebates No Longer Permitted on Beer in California

August 7th, 2014

On July 18th, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Section 25600.3 of the Business and Professions Code, which expressly prohibits beer manufacturers, importers, and wholesalers from offering, funding, sponsoring, or furnishing any type of coupon whereby a consumer gets an instant discount on beer, cider or perry, at the time of purchase. Prohibited coupons include instantly redeemable coupons (IRCs) of all kinds, whether paper, digital or electronic. The bill also prohibits retail licensees from accepting or possessing any such coupon funded by a beer wholesaler or manufacturer, although it does not prevent a retailer from offering its own coupons as set out below.

Per the bill sponsor, beer IRCs have been targets for fraud and have created liability issues for beer suppliers, as well as creating an imbalance in the beer marketplace among major breweries and the burgeoning craft beer market. The bill received major support from MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch.

Not affected by the law are mail-in rebates, retailer-sponsored coupons, instant coupons for distilled spirits and wine (provided the coupons do not also discount beer), and instant rebates offered by beer manufacturers at the production facility or other premises owned or operated by the manufacturer. This last exception keeps the door open for small brewers licensed with a Type 23 license to offer instant rebates at brew-pubs owned and operated by the brewery.

Suppliers and retailers should be careful with all beer, cider and perry coupons as they may be affected by the new prohibition. We have put together a chart below to show what coupons are caught by the law. You should check each license that is held by the sponsor to see if the law prevents the coupon.

California IRCs  by Alcohol and ABC License Type

            

 

 

Beer Manufacturer (CA or out-of-state)

Beer and Wine Wholesaler

Beer and Wine Importer

Winegrower (if wholly owned by a Beer Manufacturer)

Winegrower (not owned by Beer Manufacturer)

Retailer

Malt beverages (incl. beer)

No

No

No

No

N/A

Yes

Cider

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Perry

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Wine/spirits

N/A

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Rebate regulations vary from state to state. For more information on coupon laws for wine, beer, and distilled spirits, contact an attorney at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·

How About a Bacon Flavored Beer?

July 9th, 2014

“Ready-to-drink” alcoholic beverage categories are continuing to boom. Variously known as flavored malt beverages (FMBs), alcopops, progressive adult beverages (PABs) and ready-to-drink cocktails (RTDs), all sorts of flavors are being added to all sorts of products to create new taste sensations. Despite RTDs generally suffering some decline after Four Loko triggered state bans on adding caffeine to alcoholic beverages (covered herehereherehere, and here), the category has well and truly picked up again in recent times.

If you are looking to produce a flavored product, we have put some tips together to keep in mind.

Formulation Issues

One of the key things under federal law to be aware of with FMBs is that most of the alcohol must come from the malt beverage base. If the product is below 6% alcohol, at least half of the alcohol must come from the production of the beverage itself and cannot come from nonbeverage items like flavorings (which often contain high alcohol levels). Above 6%, no more than 1.5% of the alcohol can be from nonbeverage ingredients.

For wine-based products, an important factor to keep in mind is to make sure that your formula leaves you with a product that you can sell in grocery stores in states that do not allow them to sell wine. In New York, for example, a wine product that can be sold in grocery stores must meet a strict definition which includes that it must be below 6% alcohol, and it must contain juice and carbon dioxide. If you can meet the definition, you fall outside price posting requirements in the state, but you still have to register the brand there. Similarly, in a state like New York, you should be aware that a distilled spirits based RTD, even if below 6% or 7% alcohol, can’t be sold at grocery, convenience and pharmacy type stores where most low alcohol products are sold.

Labeling Issues

It is important to know about the various regulatory agencies that monitor the labeling of alcoholic beverages. FMBs and wine coolers, depending on their alcohol content, could fall under the regulation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), or both. For example, labeling requirements for wines containing 7% or more alcohol are controlled by the TTB, but wine coolers under 7% alcohol are regulated by the FDA, because such products do not fall under the federal definition of wine. In addition, labeling requirements for beers not made from malted barley and hops are regulated by the FDA (such as sorghum beer), while malt based products and distilled spirit based products are subject principally to TTB requirements.

If your product falls under TTB’s labeling jurisdiction, you will need to get a Certificate of Label Approval (COLA) and you will likely need to get formula approval (see, for example, our previous blog on easing up of beer formula requirements here). If your product label is FDA regulated, you will have to include a nutrition facts statement and other information that would not be required under the TTB labeling regulations. Bear in mind that even products under FDA jurisdiction for labeling still may need TTB formula approval.  You need to be careful about using any type of name which makes customers think that the product might be a spirit drink if it isn’t (including cocktail names like margarita or daiquiri).

Recycling

In addition to formulation and labeling issues, recycling laws surrounding FMBs and similar products can be tricky. Ten states, including California (with its CalRecycle program), Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon, and Vermont, have container recycling laws that apply to a variety of alcoholic beverages.  The specific products that are subject to the laws vary from state to state, as do the container marking requirements. Wine- and spirits-based products may be subject to recycling laws, even in states where wine and distilled spirits are exempted.

Conclusion

Before producing a flavored malt beverage or other ready to drink beverage, be sure to familiarize yourself with the special rules that apply to these products. For questions about any of these products, contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2014 · All Rights Reserved ·

TTB Loosens the Reins on Malt Beverage Formula Requirements

June 16th, 2014

In an industry ruling issued June 5, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) announced that malt beverages made with certain ingredients, including honey and certain fruits and spices, would no longer be subject to formula approval requirements. Additionally, the ruling exempts beer aged in barrels previously used in the production of wine or distilled spirits from the need to get a formula approval. Under the TTB regulations, ingredients and processes used in the production of malt beverages must be deemed “traditional” in order to be exempt from formula and certain labeling requirements. Until the ruling was issued, TTB had a very limited view of what met the requirements for “traditional” malt beverage production.

The ruling stems from a years long battle with the Brewer’s Association, which petitioned back in 2006 and 2007 to exempt certain ingredients and processes from rigorous approval requirements in light of growing experimentation and trends in the beer industry. The petition identified the most popular ingredients and processes, and urged the TTB to broaden their definition of “traditional” brewing methods. Initially, the TTB gave a limited response and exempted beers with added brown sugar, candy sugar or lactose from approval and special labeling requirements. With the new ruling, the options for adding ingredients to standard beers and other malt beverages without needing to go through the formula approval process are greatly expanded. Additionally, there is an opportunity for brewers to request exemption from formula requirements even if their ingredients are not already on the approved list.  A full list of the approved ingredients and processes can be viewed here.

Before the ruling, if flavors were added before, during, or after the fermentation process, that had to be included on the label. Now, the requirement for flavors is that the statement be truthful and in accordance with trade understanding. So for example, a brewer cannot say “ale brewed with cherries” if the cherries were added after the brewing process. To be clear, a statement must still appear on the label to show the addition of any non-standard beer ingredient; the ruling now simply allows for more relaxed processing and avoids the need for formula approval.

The TTB’s expanded ruling of “traditional” brewing ingredients and methods bodes well for brewers and importers looking to get a quick(er) approval for their products and will help speed up all formula approvals due to the reduced TTB workload. Currently approved formulas and labels will not be affected by the ruling.

For questions about brewing requirements, contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2014 · All Rights Reserved ·

More New York Industry Guidance on Limited Availability, Brand Registration and more

June 3rd, 2014

Following our blog post on May 6 (http://strikeandtechel.com/2014/05/06/nysla-expands-suppliers-ability-to-entertain-consumers/), regarding the new advisory from New York covering supplier events, here are some more advisories recently published by New York. The advisories summarized here cover limited availability items and closeout sales, new brand registration rules, growler information for beer and cider, and the use of third party agents for consumer tastings.

Limited Availability Items – #2014-5

New York is one of a number of states around the country which continues to require its wholesalers to post prices for wine and spirits around five weeks in advance of sale. The retail posted pricing (from in-state manufacturers and wholesalers to retailers) is available to any retailer who wants to buy the products at the posted price. In the case of products with limited availability, or in the case of closeout sales with limited inventory, the SLA published an advisory in 2013 and now replaces it with this one.

A limited availability item is one where the New York manufacturer or wholesaler believes that demand will exceed supply. As an exception to the general, and strongly enforced, rule against channel pricing, limited availability items can be allocated differently between on- and off-premises retail buyers. A closeout sale occurs when the manufacturer or wholesaler intends to sell its entire remaining inventory of an older or seasonal item at a price at least 10% lower than the last posted price.

In the case of limited availability items, the SLA is switching over the whole current price posting system to create a new category for these types of items. The new system will allow a manufacturer or wholesaler to indicate how it will allocate limited availability items. The system will also allow a manufacturer or wholesaler to move items to limited availability after prices have been posted if there is an exceptional event like a high score from a trade or consumer publication or a celebrity endorsement. In the advisory, the SLA gives a number of examples of allocation methods which are permitted.

Brand Label Registration – #2014-7

In addition to federal certificate of label approval (COLA) requirements from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), New York requires brand labels to be registered with the state for almost all alcoholic beverages. Wines over 7% alcohol which have a COLA do not generally need to be registered. Many of the changes in the new advisory parallel recent TTB changes allowing a number of label alterations without requiring a new COLA.

Brand labels must contain the brand or trade name, the class and type of alcoholic beverage, the net contents and other labeling information required for a COLA. If there is any change to the brand name, the flavor description, age or geographic appellation, or if qualifiers like “kosher” or “organic” are added to a label, a new registration must be obtained. If the alcoholic content of a brand registered product changes more than 1.5%, or 0.5% in the case of a cider or a “wine product,” a new registration must be obtained. Unlike wine, “wine products” can be sold in grocery stores if they meet the state-specific definition, which requires things like carbonation and added flavoring materials.  Registrations are filed by the brand owner, if they are a New York licensee, or otherwise by the New York wholesaler appointed by the brand owner to post prices for and sell the product.

Brand label registrations are valid for a set calendar year depending on the type of alcoholic beverage. Current registrations will remain in effect until they expire and will then be transitioned to the new schedule. There will be additional use-up periods allowed for non-compliant products.

Private labels owned by retailers who sell them exclusively are exempt from price posting requirements. The labels do not have to contain the retailer’s name, but the brand name must belong to the retailer or the retailer must have the legal right to use the name. A retailer can license the brand name from another entity but cannot license a brand name belonging to a manufacturer or wholesaler. The use of terms like “exclusively bottled for” or “exclusive to” cannot be used to try and create a private brand label for a retailer.

Growlers – #2014-11

The advisory covers the sale of beer and cider in growlers by off premise retailers authorized to sell those beverages and confirms that liquor and wine cannot be sold in growlers in New York. In the case of beer and cider, either the consumer can provide the container or the retailer can. Due to local open container laws, retailers serving growlers should provide sealed containers where applicable.

Authorized Agents for Tastings and Bottle Sales – #2014-13

Certain New York licensees, and certain out-of-state suppliers with supplier marketing permits, are allowed to provide tastings in accordance with an advisory published in July 2013. This new advisory confirms that the licensee or supplier can use another manufacturer or wholesaler licensee as its agent for such a tasting. The only exception is that a beer wholesaler is not allowed to act as an agent for a brewer.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2014 · All Rights Reserved ·

Getting Started in the Business: Licensing

December 12th, 2013

This blog entry is part of a continuing series discussing important steps to get started in the alcoholic beverage industry. Once you have pinpointed a location for your business (discussed in a previous post, here), you will need to obtain a license, or a combination of licenses, before you commence operations.  To determine what type(s) of license(s) you need, here are some answers to questions you may be asking:

*   Do the Tied-House Laws Permit Me to Hold the Licenses I Want?  Federally and across all states, “tied house” laws generally prohibit the same person or entity from having an ownership interest in alcohol beverage businesses in more than one of the 3 tiers -manufacturing/importing, distribution and retail.  (To learn more about tied house laws, review this post.)  However, that restriction is far from absolute.  Many statutory exceptions have been carved out of the 3-tier system to permit cross-tier licensing and the resulting patchwork of exceptions can be difficult to comprehend.  For example, in California, wineries can also own restaurants (subject to restrictions) and certain off-sale retail stores.  Small breweries (less than 60,000 barrels/year) can own on-sale retailers but large breweries cannot.  Beer and wine wholesalers cannot also be retailers, unless they sell only wine through the retail store.  Other states have their own set of hard-to-explain exceptions.

*   What Does My License Permit Me to Do?  The general rule is that manufacturers sell to wholesalers; wholesalers sell to retailers; and retailers sell to consumers.  But this, too, is riddled with exceptions.  California wineries and breweries can sell their products directly to retailers and consumers without using a distributor, but distilled spirits manufacturers can sell only to distributors and cannot themselves hold a distributor license.  Rectifiers, on the other hand, can act as their own distributor and sell their products – and spirits products made by anyone else – directly to retailers.  Moreover, you may need more than one license to operate your business.  For example, if you are going to be operating a distillery, you will need a Type 4 (Distilled Spirits Manufacturer’s license), and a Type 6 (Still) license.  If you are importing distilled spirits from outside of California and distributing them to retailers you’ll need a Type 12 (Distilled Spirits Importer), and a Type 18 (Distilled Spirits Wholesaler).  California issues dozens of different licenses so it is important to know exactly what you want to do, which licenses are needed to accomplish it, and whether you are eligible to hold them.

*   What are the Processing Times to Obtain a License?  In California, it takes about 90-120 days to process an application for a new license, and slightly less time to transfer an existing license at a premises that is already licensed. It will take longer to process an application that is incomplete, contested by neighboring residents or the local authorities, or filed incorrectly.  Also keep in mind that the ABC cannot issue a license until it has received confirmation from the City/County that all required use permits have been obtained.  Each applicant will be assigned a local ABC investigator to handle the application until the process is completed.  Currently, U.S. Alcohol Tobacco Tax Trade Bureau (“TTB”) licenses are processing in about 90 days, similar to California licenses.

*   May I Obtain a Temporary Permit?  Provided that you are transferring an existing license at an already licensed premises, the California ABC may grant a temporary permit so you may operate your business while the license transfer application is being processed. A temporary permit is not available in connection with applications for new licenses or applications to transfer existing licenses to a premises that has not been previously licensed.

*    What Are the Costs Involved?  Depending on what type(s) of license(s) applied for, the cost can vary considerably.  A schedule of license costs is available here.  Some retail licenses are limited in numbers and must be purchased on the open market.  Prices for these licenses vary greatly by type and location.  For instance, a Type-47 (On-sale general eating place) may sell for $200,000 in San Francisco, whereas the same type of license in Fresno County currently only costs $12,000.

In conjunction with your ABC application, you may also need to obtain other federal, state or local licenses/permits.   In California this may include, for example:  federal licenses through the TTB; a certification from the Secretary of State that you are qualified to do business in the state; and a sales tax permit from the State Board of Equalization.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have questions about applying for a license to get started in the alcohol beverage business.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·

Clarifications from the ABC on Sweepstakes and Contests in California

October 17th, 2013

On June 13, 2013, guests attending ShipCompliant’s “Direct 2013” conference heard from Matthew Botting, General Counsel to the California ABC, on supplier participation in sweepstakes and contests under California’s new law.  We’ve previously blogged about the new law here and here.

California Code of Regulations Title 4, Section 106 (“Rule 106”) has always allowed suppliers to “sponsor” a contest, meaning suppliers could give money or otherwise participate when the contest was organized by “bona fide amateur or professional organizations.”  Previously, the privilege was limited.  Now, the privileges are broader:  suppliers (including wineries) can now “conduct” a contest under recently enacted Business and Professions Code Section 25600.1, and conduct or sponsor a sweepstakes under 25600.2.  Mr. Botting discussed the different available privileges and their limitations:

*   “Conduct” means the promotion is managed and organized by the supplier.
*   “Sponsor” means it is someone else’s sweepstakes or contest and the supplier is providing a prize or other sponsorship of the promotion.
*    For the time being, suppliers can only sponsor a contest in accordance with the existing Rule 106, which means sponsorship is limited to a contest conducted by bona fide amateur or professional organizations.
*    Sponsoring a sweepstakes and conducting a sweepstakes or contest is now covered by Business and Professions Code Section 25600.1 and 25600.2.  Sweepstakes or contests cannot require a visit to a licensed premises of any kind, so there must be an alternate method of entry (“AMOE”) if entry forms are available at a licensee.
*     Sweepstakes and contests cannot be conducted on retail premises (e.g., a grocery store, liquor store, bar or restaurant).  A “retail premise” includes some locations you might not think of, such as: an unlicensed premises if a licensed caterer is present, or at an event held by a nonprofit under a one-day permit. The ABC considers events held with a caterer’s license or a nonprofit one-day permit to occur “at the premises of a retail licensee,” and therefore a supplier may only provide a means of entry at either of these types of events.
*     While suppliers may provide a means of entry for the contest or sweepstakes, the contest or sweepstakes may not be conducted at a winery or brewery’s duplicate tasting room.
*     A contest or sweepstakes can only be advertised at a retailer if it is advertised at a minimum of three different retailers, and winners shouldn’t be picked at a licensed retail event nor in a tasting room.

The full presentation by Mr. Botting can be seen here (starting at the 5:00 minute mark).

Before conducting or sponsoring any contest or sweepstakes, be sure to consult the relevant laws, Business & Professions Code Sections 25600.1, 25600.2, and, if applicable, Rule 106 (regarding contests), and pay particular attention to whether the supplier involved holds a license that allows it to participate.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have questions about contests and sweepstakes in California or other states.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·

Governor Cuomo Signs Law Allowing New York Wine to be Sold at Local Farmers’ Markets

October 10th, 2013

On October 1, 2013, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law S. 267/A.1512, creating a new venue for New York wineries to sell their wines to consumers.  As of March 26, 2014, farm market stands may apply for a new “roadside farm market license” to sell New York State labeled wine that is produced by no more than 2 licensed farm wineries, micro-wineries or special wineries located within 20 miles of the roadside farmers’ market.

This law is in keeping with Governor Cuomo’s efforts to bolster the New York wine industry.  In a statement released after enacting the new law, Governor Cuomo said: “These new laws will build on our continuing efforts to promote New York’s wine industry across the state and beyond, boosting tourism, local economies and job growth.  We are increasing market opportunities for local producers and farmers…Our state is home to hundreds of wineries that produce some of the best wine in the world, and we want both New Yorkers and visitors to come and enjoy them.”

The new law does not include tasting privileges at the farm stands, which is probably not surprising, given the possible connection between wine tasting at a roadside stand and driving a car.  We’ll be interested to see if other states follow New York’s lead and enact legislation to license farm stands.

For the full text of the new law, click here.

Contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have questions about licensing in New York or any other state.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·

Facebook Eases Restrictions on Promotions Conducted on Commercial Facebook Pages

September 11th, 2013

On August 27, 2013, Facebook announced changes to make it easier for businesses to create and administer promotions on the website.  This means any business – including alcohol beverage industry members – can now collect entries for sweepstakes or contests using Facebook itself.  Prior to these changes, all promotions on Facebook had to be administered through applications.  Now, promotions can be administered on Page Timelines or in applications, though they may not be administered on personal Timelines.  For example, now it is possible for businesses to:

- Collect entries by having users post on the company’s Page or comment/like a post

- Collect entries via messages users send to the company’s Page

- Have promotions including a voting element based on likes

You can read more about the changes here.  If you have any questions about the ins and outs of using social media as part of the business marketing and promotional plans for companies in the alcohol beverage industry, call one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·

Winery Direct Shipping Coming Soon to Montana

August 26th, 2013

Starting October 1, 2013, Montana will allow the direct shipment of wine to Montana residents by wineries that hold a Direct Shipment Endorsement. Holders of a Direct Shipment Endorsement may sell and directly ship up to 18 nine-liter cases of wine annually to an individual in Montana who is at least 21 years of age. Any in-state or out-of-state winery that is already registered with the Montana Department of Revenue must pay $50 and file associated paperwork to receive a Direct Shipment Endorsement, and wineries not already registered with the state will be able to simultaneously register with the state and apply for a Direct Shipper Endorsement. Applicants must submit a signed affidavit that they will contract only with common carriers that agree that wine will be delivered only to an individual in Montana who is at least 21 years old and who signs upon receipt of the wine. Records may be due every month and every quarter, and must be held for state inspection for up to three years. All taxes must be paid quarterly and tax records submitted monthly (by the 15th date of the following month) to the Department of Revenue. If a holder of a Direct Shipment Endorsement uses a bonded wine warehouse for fulfillment purposes, the endorsement holder must file a written notice that includes the name and address of the warehouse. The state also requires pre-approval of all wine labels to be shipped into the state. Stay tuned as Montana will likely issue regulations and step-by-step instructions in the coming months.

If you have any questions about shipping wine directly to Montana residents, or residents of any other state, contact one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·

Kentucky Changes Alcohol Beverage Laws – Requires Out of State Shipper’s Licenses for Wine and Spirits

August 14th, 2013

With the passage of Senate Bill 13 (“SB 13”), effective June 25, 2013, Kentucky modernized its alcoholic beverage laws in an effort to make them more effective and efficient for manufacturers, distributors and retailers alike.  This modernization included consolidating licenses, simplifying the licensing process, and most importantly for out of state wine and spirits suppliers, it created an out of state shipper permit.  Prior to the revisions, beer suppliers were required to hold a license to ship to Kentucky distributors but suppliers of distilled spirits and wine were not.

The new Out-of-State Distilled Spirits/Wine Producers/Supplier license application is available here:  http://abc.ky.gov/License%20Applications%202013/outofstate.pdf

Three classes of the new Out-of-State Distilled Spirits/Wine Producers/Supplier license are available:

-  Out of State Producer/Supplier for 50,000 gallons or more ($1,550 a year/$3,100 for 2 years);
-  Limited Producer/Supplier for 2,001 to 49,999 gallons ($260 a year/$520 for 2 years); and
-  Micro-Producer/Supplier for 2,000 gallons or less ($10 a year/$20 for 2 years).

Below are some of the other key changes ushered in by the passage of SB 13:

-  Consolidates 88 different license types into 44, changing the names of the licenses and fees associated with each, but keeping unchanged the privileges afforded to the licensees.  A few examples:  A “Vintner” license is now a “Winery” license, a “Blender’s” license was eliminated and its privileges consolidated into the “Rectifier’s” license.
-  Allows a two-year license term renewal for manufacturers and wholesalers, in addition to a one-year license option.
-  Bundles together several non-quota retail-drink licenses.
-  Creates a Transporter license, consolidating six former transportation-related licenses into one.
-  Eliminates bond requirements for many license types
-  Changes the licensing structure for microbreweries.

For more information on the changes to Kentucky’s alcohol beverage laws, visit the Kentucky Liquor Control’s information page at http://www.klc.org/UserFiles/files/KACOinfosheet.pdf

And of course, you can always call one of the attorneys at Strike & Techel if you have any questions about any of the changes to Kentucky’s alcohol beverage laws, or if you have any general questions about shipping to distributors in any state.

Imbiblog is published for general informational purposes only and is not intended as legal advice. Copyright © 2013 · All Rights Reserved ·